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Section: Questions   Category: Halacha
  A r c h i v e s
Halacha - bone china toiyvel
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: Bone china is a mix of animal bone and porcelain. A utensil made from bone does not require tevila at all. Porcelain, which is regular china, is a machlokes whether it is more similar to ceramic which does not need tevila or glass which does miDerabbannnan. Since most china is coated with a glass, enamel glaze, it should be toiveled without a beracha regardless of the Halacha of bone china itself.
posted:2008-12-29 21:21:16  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - stains
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: If it is just a stain absorbed in the walls of the vessel but not felt with the finger, it is OK. However, if there are pieces stuck on, you must scrub until you remove them completely.
posted:2008-11-25 02:49:09  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - glazed ceramics
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

Nearly all ceramic cups today are coated with an enamel glaze and need to be toiveled, but without a beracha.

posted:2008-09-10 02:58:56  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Toiveling Keilim
Submitted by Rivky  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: It would depend if the source of the water is from rain or from a spring, and also if the lake has an outlet. Since the Halachos of a mikva are very complicated and metal pots require tevila Mi'Deoraisa, it is advisable to use a reliable mikva and not a lake.
posted:2008-08-14 17:09:58  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Tevilas Keilim
Submitted by Shmuel D.  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

Excellent point, let me clarify. While R' Shlomo Zalman Auerbach zatzal mentions the sevara that any appliance that only works when plugged in is exempt from tevilas keilim, he did not rely on this alone l'chatchila. Therefore, regarding the urn, I replied the proper manner to do tevila or disassemble the appliance, but regarding the water cooler I brought various reasons to explain the minhag to be lenient b'dieved.

posted:2008-07-16 12:06:11  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Water cooler
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

An interesting question. Obviously it would be prohibitively difficult to toivel and the minhag is certainly not to, but is there justification for such a hanhaga? Assuming the receptacle inside is made of metal one would have to rely on a combination of factors to permit the water cooler. First of all it is not used as a utensil at a meal (kli seuda), and as a means of preparation it is only obligates in tevila mi'Derabannan. Furthermore, since it only works when plugged into an electrical outlet, R' Shlomo Zalman Aurbach zatzal considers it to be mechubar l'karka and not mekabel tumah. However, if it has a mechanical faucet as opposed to an electronic one this may not be true.

posted:2008-06-24 15:01:19  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Toiveling dishes
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: The source in the Torah for toiveling dishes is from Bamidbar 31:23 see Rashi, Gemorra Avoda Zara 75b and Shulchan Aruch YD120. However, since it is not explicit in the Torah, it is considered an asmachta and not a D'Oraisa.
posted:2008-04-23 10:18:17  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Toivel Hot water Urn
Submitted by Frumie  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: It is true that disassembling and reassembling an integral part of the urn obviates the need for hagala, however this only applies if the work done is maaseh uman, something that could only be done by a professional not an average person. Furthermore, it must also be a part that when disassembled renders the urn unusable. However if the urn is electric but not electronic, then it should be safe to imerse in the mikva as long as you wait a couple of days to dry completely before plugging it in (I don't take responsibility for this idea, but I have done it myself without any ill effects). However, if it is one of the new electronic urns it shouldn't be imersed at all and is very problematic.
posted:2008-04-13 09:13:48  (2) comments   email to a friend


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