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Section: Questions   Category: Halacha
  A r c h i v e s
Halacha - checking eggs
Submitted by Yizchok Bmispar  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

I presume your question is "does a financial incentive render a generally unreliable non-Jew reliable for checking eggs?"

The answer to this question requires a little background information. A fertilized egg which is usually noticeable from a spot of blood is forbidden Min HaTorah, and the entire egg is forbidden not just the blood. Regarding such eggs one may not rely on a child under Bar/Bas Mitzva to check and certainly not a Goy. Also, as many have learned and continue the custom, one should not cook less than three whole eggs together if there is a risk that one may be fertilized. However in today's world nearly all eggs are grown on commercial farms with no roosters on site and no risk of fertilization. Any red spots in our eggs are questionable if they are blood at all and certainly do not signify fertilization. Therefore, if one is using commercially grown eggs, while the eggs should be checked and if one finds a red spot the egg or at least the spot should be discarded, even a Goy would be sufficient for this. Since it is reasonable to assume that the non-Jewish workers will not look seriously for blood spots that they consider insignificant, it is certainly a clever idea to give them an incentive to take their job seriously. If one purchases organic eggs or receives eggs from someone's backyard then there is a real risk of fertilization, and paying non-Jewish workers to find blood spots would not help.

posted:2008-09-01 16:01:53  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Issur V'heter
Submitted by Chaim  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

There are many considerations to be lenient here. First of all the piece that fell may not have been hot at the time it fell. Even if it was hot, it presumably fell from the plate or fork, which would make it maximum an irui mi'kli sheini. Even though we are machmir on a davar gush, but it is only a chumra. Additionally since the table is not used directly for milchigs, the worst problem would be nat bar nat. It isn't even clear if the piece that fell was actually meat or just a bean or potato. Also, whatever fell, it certainly is no longer ben yomo. In any event, a bliya on a non-metal object only affects the place of actual contact and not the entire table.

Therefore, ideally you should pour boiling water on the place where the cholent was found, and then there is no need to notify the buyer of any issues. Even though hagola on a table usually requires a hot stone, and Formica according to some opinions should not be kashered, but under these circumstances it is mutar l'chatchila.

posted:2008-08-25 12:05:22  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Non-kosher microwave oven
Submitted by Eli  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: Technically speaking double wrapping you food would work, but it is often not a practical solution. A microwave heats the water molecules and causes more steam than a conventional oven. This rising steam causes pressure that is likely to rupture the seal and force or melt open the wrapping, which would render your lunch forbidden. Therefore I would not recommend its use.
posted:2008-08-11 14:37:50  (2) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - status of fleishig silverware in milchig dishwasher
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: If the forks were not known to have been used for hot meat within the past 24 hours, there is no need to do anything to the milchig items. However, the forks should be kashered in any event.
posted:2008-08-05 09:36:59  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - kashrus
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

If the onion was fried alone in the meaty pot then there could be a problem, but if the onion was boiled in water with the rest of the soup then we look at the soup as a whole, which is not sharp tasting, and it retains its parve status.

posted:2008-08-03 15:13:05  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - bossor ve holov
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

The cholent is mutar. First of all since 24 hours have passed, the container cannot asser the cholent b'dieved. Secondly, the ice cream container never contained hot milchigs nor did it likely contain cold dairy liquids for more than 24 hours, so the container is really pareve.

posted:2008-08-03 09:49:42  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - kashrus
Submitted by aaron  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

Step 1: If the meat pot contained actual meat and was still very hot when poured into the cold sink, then yes the sink becomes meat. However, if there were only pareve foods in the meat pot or of the contents of the pot were less than 110F the sink would retain its original status.

Step 2: If the milk pot and the sink were both dry and clean, then both the sink and the pot are permitted and nothing more needs to be done because flavor id not imparted from one utensil (sink) to another (pot, or visa versa) without an intermediary. However, if the pot had milk on the outside or if the sink had meat residue, then both the sink and pot are now treif and need to be kashered. A small amount of moisture on the pot or in the sink is not a problem.

Step 3: If kashering is required, the pot should not be used for 24 hours after a thorough cleaning and then must be immersed in a large vat of boiling water. There are many other important details, and I don't recommend doing this yourself if you don't have prior experience. Regarding the sink, if it is made from unpainted stainless steel it can be kashered as for Pesach. However, if it is made from porcelain or enamel it is a much bigger problem.

posted:2008-08-01 01:52:42  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - 'Kemach Yashan' and OU
Submitted by Sagi  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

1) The Torah says that one may not eat grains from the 5 species of wheat, oats, barley, rye and spelt that began growing after Pesach until the following Pesach. In practice this means that winter wheat is not a problem since it begins growing before Pesach, but spring wheat in many parts of the world would be problematic from the end of the summer when it has been harvested and processed until Pesach. However, there is a machlokes in the Mishna whether this prohibition only applies to grains grown in Eretz Yisroel or even to crops planted in Chutz l'Aretz, and the Rishonim disagree who the Halacha follows. While the majority of the Rishonim forbid chadash grown in Chutz l'Aretz and it is an issue of an issur d'oraisa, the minhag in most places was to follow the lenient opinion due to the difficulty in storing their dietary staple for extended periods, and many Poskim justified this leniency.

2) The OU's position is to rely on the lenient opinion and permit grain products grown outside of Eretz Yisroel. Therefore, during the fall and winter it should be assumed that any OU product containing any flour, starch etc. is chadash unless you know otherwise. The biggest expert in the practicalities of which products are problematic and when, is Rav Yosef Herman who prints an annual Yashan Guide. He can be contacted at yherman@earthlink.net.

2) The OU's position is to rely on the lenient opinion and permit grain products grown outside of Eretz Yisroel. Therefore, during the fall and winter it should be assumed that any OU product containing any flour, starch etc. is chadash unless you know otherwise.

posted:2008-07-30 11:02:31  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - vaccines
Submitted by Sephanyah Ben Yehuda  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: I'm not familiar with the specific vaccine, but if it is injected and not swallowed, as are all vaccines I am familiar with, it does not need to be Kosher.
posted:2008-07-28 15:23:38  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - glass
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

According to the Mechaber and the custom of Sefardim glass plates may be used both for meat and dairy provided they are carefully cleaned in between. However the Rema holds the opposite extreme, that glass utensils cannot be kashered and remain forever in their original status. Ashkenazi Jews follow the opinion of the Rema and do not use glass for hot meat and dairy except under extenuating circumstances.

posted:2008-06-29 19:03:56  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - kosher kitchen
Submitted by leah danan  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

Formica countertops should be thoroughly cleaned. After waiting 24 hours of no contact with hot food, one should pour boiling water directly from the pot on to the counter and roll a hot metal pipe or similar object to maintain the temperature of the boiling water. As you can gather this is not a simple (or safe) procedure and should only be done by someone with experience if at all.

If the gas range has grates they should be blowtorched or replaced, the glass surface does not come in contact with the food and needs no more than a good cleaning. If you have a smooth glass range where the pot rests directly on the glass, it can not be kashered.

posted:2008-06-01 10:30:02  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - 4 Questions - Kashrut.
Submitted by Linda Haniford  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

1. If the crockpot contained only water, even if it had been used for fleishigs within the past 24 hours there is no problem with the hotpot and its water may be used with milchigs. If it contained a fleishig liquid, then the hotpot would need to be kashered.

2. As long as the disposable tablecover is dry and intact, it is sufficient to prevent any transfer of flavor. Of course, if the thin plastic tablecloth tears or melts you will have a problem. If it gets wet you could also potentially have a problem, so I would suggest using a trivet or hot pad under hot food.

3. I would not recommend kashering a microwave (or dishwasher) with soapy water for exactly the reason you mention, it is nearly impossible to remove all the particles of food which is a necessary precondition for kashering.

4. You may begin counting 6 hours from when you conclude eating the meat itself.

posted:2008-05-20 17:05:42  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Alternative Medicine that isn't kosher
Submitted by yocheved rosenwaser  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

 

There are number of issues that must be addressed.

If the glucosamin is only manufactured from the inedible shell of the shellfish, as I found mentioned in one source, then the medicine would not be considered treif to begin with, if there are no other problematic ingredients.

If the glucosamin is not kosher; have you been diagnosed with osteoarthritis or other similar condition that would lead you to be classified as a choleh, or did the doctor recommend these pills as a preventative measure?

If you are considered a choleh, it still remains to determine if glucosamine is a halachically reliable method of treating your illness. From the information I found, while numerous studies confirmed the efficacy, they were all sponsored by the manufacturer. Most of the independent studies found no difference in results from a placebo.

posted:2008-05-13 10:30:36  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - hilchos bosar vechalav
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: The mushrooms would be permitted even to eat with cheese since the pan was not used for 24 hours and is presumably clean. However, onions are considered a sharp food that is problematic even after 24 hours have passed and should not be eaten even with milchig cutlery. Even though sauteed onions are not sharp, but they would have absorbed the fleishig flavor before they became cooked. If the onions and mushrooms were cut into very small pieces and mixed together, we would consider the entire mixture to follow the status of the majority component.
posted:2008-05-06 18:27:22  (0) comments   email to a friend


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