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Section: Questions   Category: Halacha
  A r c h i v e s
Halacha - new house
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

If the house is newly built, there is no need to kasher the kitchen. However if the house had previously been used by someone who does not keep kosher then the sinks and counters should certainly be kashered. If you already used keilim they do not become treif, but try to be careful that hot keilim do not come into contact with non-kosher surfaces until you can kasher the sinks and counters.

posted:2008-11-25 02:55:21  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - kosher
Submitted by ziva aronova  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

1) Because G-d told us to at Mount Sinai over 3000 years ago.

2) It is essential for the spiritual health of a Jew, we don't understand exactly how or why.

3) While there technically is a very specific difference, today the word "glatt" is used as a general term to mean the food conforms to the highest standards of Kosher.

posted:2008-11-23 20:12:10  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - one sink
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

The use of soap will not make a difference in Halacha, the Poskim agree that we can not assume that it renders all food particle instantly inedible. However, Rav Moshe Feinstein zatzal allowed the use of one sink for washing milk and meat dishes because there is no direct contact between the meat and milk. However if one only has one sink it would be preferable to either use not more than lukewarm water or to place separate racks on the bottom of the sink to prevent contact between the dishes and the non-Kosher sink. Certainly the sink must be cleaned well from any residue in between its use for meat and milk.

posted:2008-11-22 22:32:12  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - onions
Submitted by B.A  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

If the onions were chopped with a pareve knife on a pareve cutting board then they remain pareve even if they were placed in a fleishig container afterwards. A sharp food like an onion only absorbs and gives off flavor when pressure is applied. If the onions were cut with a fleishig knife, then they may not be eaten together with milchig food, but they may be eaten off a milchig plate and the container does not become fleishig.

posted:2008-11-22 16:44:08  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Kashering sink
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

I'm not sure what you mean "but i didnt put hot water to stam under the faucet spout", but if you waited 24 hours then nothing would become treif if you already did it. The only issue would be how to behave from now on.

posted:2008-11-17 02:21:02  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Yayin Nesech
Submitted by Tom Reiner  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

The non-Jews used to worship idols and part of their service was pouring wine libations to the deities. Wine that was used in idol worship would be forbidden to drink according to Torah law, and wine merely touched by a non-Jew is forbidden by Rabbinic decree out of concern that they may have poured the wine to an idol. While the Gemorra already acknowledges that non-Jews were no longer dedicated to their idols to present a realistic concern of actually performing the libation, the enactment remains in place.

posted:2008-11-09 16:15:29  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - knives
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

A sharp, treif food will only make the counter treif if pressure is applied, for example if it is cut or crushed on the counter, but not just by touching. However, a hot treif food will make the counter non-Kosher even with contact alone. Cutlery is the same, if you cut or stab a sharp treif food the fork or knife will no longer be Kosher until kashered. Also, if the utensil comes in contact with hot non-Kosher food it will no longer be permitted to use.

posted:2008-11-04 19:18:56  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - a jew that cook non kosher for goyim
Submitted by s. merimi  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: You may not cook or mix hot dairy and meat together even if only one is hot. Other non-Kosher foods may be cooked, presuming you are not likely to taste them.
posted:2008-10-04 21:38:39  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - LIGHITING OF STOVES FOR COOKING?
Submitted by BARBARA SYMON  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

According to the Shulchan Aruch and Sefardi practice a Jew must both light the fire and place the food in the oven. According to the Rema and Ashkenazi practice it is sufficient if a Jew either lights the fire or places the food in the oven.

The reason one may not eat food cooked by a non-Jew is that Chazal were concerned that the intimacy resulting from dining together would lead to intermarriage. Therefore, these restrictions do not apply to a non-observant Jew who is permitted to marry an observant one.

posted:2008-09-17 15:59:41  (2) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Bugs In Pitted Prunes
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

It is fine. Prunes from the US are generally not infested and do not require checking.

posted:2008-09-17 14:09:13  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - food
Submitted by Judith  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

If they have a valid hechsher there is no problem. Without a hechsher there could be numerous problems, such as the machinery used for pasteurization.

posted:2008-09-13 15:25:00  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Kashrut: financial pressures affect reliability
Submitted by Clifford Felder  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

First of all, while a private hechsher certainly has a disadvantage and a greater challenge to remain objective, it would seem to me extreme to say that one that has built up a sterling reputation of many years cannot be trusted. Even a large established organization needs a lot of yiras shomayim to admit when they make a mistake, because the most valuable asset to a hechsher is its reputation.

Regarding your question, "blindly holding the highest standards" would require passing on the added cost to the consumer, and the organization must make a judgment call which standards are important enough to demand and which are extra chumros. Also, we live in teva, nature, and an individual or organization must take reasonable precautions as part of the obligation of hishtadlus. Furthermore bitachon and yiras shomayim are challenges that require a lifetime of work to achieve, inevitably not all of us are holding on the same sublime level. While wrong, it would only be human nature if occasionally even the director of a hechsher would make an incorrect decision due to financial pressure, just like each of us inevitably does on occasion. As your Rav pointed out, this would be less likely to occur when there is a Beis Din or other higher administration that the Rav HaMachshir must justify his decisions to.

posted:2008-09-08 05:16:51  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - bugs in flour
Submitted by Linda  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

Your afterthought is correct. You could have cleaned the sifter well and resifted the flour. Sifting it two more times would have been a very prudent idea. However, since your intention was to be careful regarding the serious prohibitions regarding consuming insects, you will not lose any money due to your diligence. Many Poskim hold that expenses incurred from all Mitzvos are repaid from Shomayim and not just expenses for Shabbos.

posted:2008-09-07 08:07:46  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Kashering
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

If the frying pan was also hot, preferably it should be blowtorched and if impossible one may immerse it in a pot of boiling water. If the pan was cold and only a few drops of hot michigs splattered on it, after a thorough cleaning it is sufficient to pour boiling water from a kettle on the pan. Since the pan is presumably made from metal, the whole pan must be kashered. If the pan is Teflon coated, then many Poskim do not permit it to be kashered at all.

posted:2008-09-02 14:18:42  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Kashrut
Submitted by Baruch  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

If there is any possibility that a dirty fleishig spoon etc. might have been placed into the pareve food, then it should be considered fleishig in every way. However if you know with certainty that dedicated utensils were always used in the preparation and serving of the food, then it depends if the pot and utensils used to cook the food were used for fleishigs within the past 24 hours. If not, the food may be considered pareve in every way and may even be eaten together with milchigs. If the pot was ben yomo, then the pareve food is called nat bar nat and may not be eaten together with milchigs but may be reheated and served with milchig utensils, whether hot or cold.

posted:2008-09-02 14:17:34  (0) comments   email to a friend


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