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Section: Questions   Category: Halacha
  A r c h i v e s
Halacha - shechita
Submitted by shlomo zalman  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: I doubt if the health department would allow meat to be sold if the animal had tranquilizers in its bloodstream. However in Halacha the issue is similar to stunning an animal, which the Poskim forbid. Since the animal is currently unconscious and unable to walk, we are concerned that it may have become a traifa.
posted:2009-09-01 18:42:11  (2) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - kashrus
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

Even though Reb Moshe Feinstein zatzal wrote that one may kasher and use a stainless dishwasher if you replace the racks, for practical reasons it should not be done. First of all, the tracks for the racks usually have plastic parts that cannot be kashered. Secondly, particles of food can easily become trapped between the runners and the walls of the dishwasher, and hagala does not help unless all the mamshus is completely removed. Finally, the drain filter and pipes where the dirty water exits the dishwasher are full of residue, and on most models cannot be thoroughly cleaned. When running the unit, it is very likely that hot water could back up from the drain into the chamber and render all the dishes and silverware treif.

I would suggest you tell your wife that you asked a Rav who said that Halacha does not permit using the dishwasher, and it is not just a chumra.

posted:2009-08-20 04:49:10  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Basar B'Chalav
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: While there is no obligation in Halacha to have separate counter-tops, and in previous generations few frum Jews had this luxury, it is highly recommended for practical considerations if you want to facilitate keeping a kosher kitchen. Firstly it is not uncommon to place a hot pot or pan on the counter, and there is reason to be concerned that one may place a hot milchig utensil in the same place that a hot fleishig container was previously situated creating problems of bliyos, absorbed taste. Even if you are careful to use a trivet, if hot food would fall on the counter it is possible it could fall in the place that previously made contact with hot food from the opposing side. Additionally and most importantly, most people do not keep there counters spotlessly clean and even cold foods could come in contact with residue of old milchig or fleishig remnants.
posted:2009-08-07 03:18:03  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Terumah and Maaser
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

First of all with fruits there is an additional problem of orla besides the issue of teruma and maaser, and you should not purchase fruits without a reliable hechsher unless you know which species are likely to be orla and which are not.

For vegetables the procedure is to first get hold of a peruta chamura, a coin that has been specially designated for the purpose. There is an organization that takes care of this, but I don't have their contact info handy. You must separate at least 1% of the produce and say the formula usually printed in the back of the siddur. It is important to understand what you are saying, read through it before you actually are separating terumos and maaser and ask someone to help you if any of the concepts are unfamiliar. The produce you separated should be double-wrapped, and then it may be disposed.

posted:2009-07-18 15:36:17  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Kasherin a keily
Submitted by moty  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: If the KitchenAid was never used for hot food and was also never used with onions or sharp spices, it is satisfactory to clean it well. If it was used for "hot" foods the metal components need to be imersed in boiling water, and I have described the exact procedure other places on this site.
posted:2009-06-29 16:44:18  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - kashrus
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: Assuming you are referring to plates and other pottery utensils that only come in contact with food after it has been removed from the pot it was cooked in on the fire, the "bottom line" in Halacha is that it may be used after kashering 3 times in boiling water changing the water between each of the three. However the minhag is not to use ceramics at all, and this should be followed except in case of significant financial loss.
posted:2009-06-11 08:16:45  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - kosher oven
Submitted by Barney  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: The grill is dairy, however there are still options how the oven can be used for meat. Ideally the rack should be removed from the oven and thoroughly blowtorched until the entire grill glows, this would render the surface no longer dairy. A simpler option is to carefully clean the grate from any residue of the pizza and to place a sheet of aluminum foil between the dairy grill and the pan of meat. This intervening layer prevents any dairy flavor in the rack from transferring to the pan of meat.
posted:2009-06-04 02:14:31  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - basar bchalav
Submitted by AVROHOm  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

Yes, it should be kashered.

posted:2009-05-04 18:09:05  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Help With Urn Made Fleishig
Submitted by joy  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

The urn must be kashered before using for Pareve. This can be done by cleaning it thoroughly and filling it to the top with water which should be boiled over. If you don't have experience doing this it is advisable to find someone who can help you.

posted:2009-04-26 15:39:18  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - wine & sushi
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

Certainly the Kosher glass does not make the wine or juice permitted to drink. However the glass does not need to be kashered if the non-kosher liquid was cold and did not sit inside the glass more than 24 hours.

Regarding the sushi, I would be interested to hear a reason why the rice should be the ikar.

posted:2009-04-23 14:56:12  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - s.c. oven solves milching/fleishing/parve problem?
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

Theoretically one could change between all 3 with a self-clean cycle un between. However there are two issues to deal with. First of all according to many opinions the self-clean cycle can only serve as kashering if it reaches a temperature of at least 900-1000F. While American self-clean ovens do get thus hot, I have heard that the European ones do not. Additionally the Magen Avraham points out a very practical problem that if one changes the status of a utensil from milk to meat, he could easily become confused where it is holding and use it for the wrong use. Therefore he rules that one may not change from meat to milk and the opposite without other considerations, and this is the Ashkenazi minhag. I don't know if Sefardim accepted this chumra, but it certainly seems like a very legitimate concern.

posted:2009-04-02 14:03:09  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Dairy cutting board used for meat
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

Since the cutting board had not been used with dairy for more than 24 hours prior to its use with meat, it does not make other objects treif. The only exception would be an onion that was cut with a fleishig knife on the dairy cutting board. Even the knife itself does not need to be kashered according to most opinions, although it is preferable to do so.

posted:2009-04-02 09:37:42  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - used keilim
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

It is not necessary to toivel a corkscrew or can opener, since they are not intended to come in direct contact with the food. Since it is unlikely that either was used on hot food or soaked in liquid for 24 hours, it is not necessary to do more then clean them well. The blade may not be used even cold unless it is kashered properly.

posted:2009-03-03 10:38:02  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - meat and dairy
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: Since the mug is presumably a kli sheini the spoon and mug need no kashering.
posted:2009-03-02 13:54:35  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - old treif pots
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: It is permitted to eat the food cooked in the pot, provided the food is not sharp or spicy. An oven is even less problematic because the food does not come in direct contact with the walls of the oven.
posted:2009-02-13 16:10:10  (0) comments   email to a friend


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