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Section: Questions   Category: Halacha
  A r c h i v e s
Halacha - Kashrut
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: The grapes may be eaten. Grapes are generally not infested to a degree that we would assume that there are bugs, it is merely a suspicion.
posted:2015-07-13 14:05:01  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - knife sharpener
Submitted by steve  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: It is highly recommended, as a knife might be sharpened when not perfectly clean and grease would accumulate on the sharpener.
posted:2014-02-02 22:43:51  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Checking the shechitah knife
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: The accepted procedure today is that Shochtim only  check a knife on their nail, and not on the flesh at all.
posted:2014-01-06 09:55:02  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Spices
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

Generally, all food products, including spices, should be certified. The intricacies of modern food production can create unimaginable issues with seemingly innocuous ingredients. Nevertheless, there are some spices which can be used without certification. The following link contains a chart of which do and don't. http://www.crcweb.org/spice_list.php

posted:2013-11-20 14:53:11  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - kosher not mevushal wine
Submitted by renee reinharz  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

I'm afraid that it is difficult for me explain, you should ask the Rav who said it. If the wines truly have a fine Hechsher and will be consumed in a controlled environment, I see no problem with their non-Mevushal status.

posted:2013-11-14 16:38:09  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Kashrus
Submitted by Jeremy Lynn  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: If the wine was cold and remained in the bowl les than 24 hours, the bowl is still Kosher and merely needs to be rinsed out.
posted:2013-10-18 08:27:01  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - kashrus
Submitted by JJ  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: The spoon is permitted, as it only received old Fleishig flavor from the pot. However, the pot must be Kashered, as it is Fleishig and now contains fresh Milchig flavor. You must thoroughly clean the pot, wait 24 hours, and immerse it in a vat of boiling water.
posted:2013-10-01 07:30:59  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - kashrus of cut lime in drink
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: I would advise not drinking it. Assuming a lime is considered "charif", the knife very likely was washed in hot water together with non-Kosher items, and possibly used to cut non-Kosher food, in the past. Even though more than 24 hours may have passed, cutting a sharp food is still forbidden.
posted:2013-08-01 11:00:39  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Kashrus
Submitted by Daniel  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: The tongs and eggs are permitted, because the Milchig pot does not have the ability to forbid anything without a sharp tatste due to the age of the absorbed flavor. The pot is also permitted; even though it receives fresh Milchig flavor, by the time it reaches the pot is is already nat bar nat (2 steps removed) and doe snot become forbidden. Rama YD 95:3
posted:2013-07-25 10:08:57  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Non-Kosher Supermarket
Submitted by Shmuel Dorr  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:  

First of all, the name "tilapia" is often used to refer no numerous species of fish, not all of which are Kosher.

Secondly, we generally do not trust a gentile to make this identification; especially when he stands to gain by declaring it a potentially more expensive variety.

Furthermore, even if we were certain that this fish was Kosher, the knife used to cut it was very likely used previously to cut non-Kosher fish.

Generally speaking, Kosher fish should only be purchased with some skin attached to enable the identification of scales unless it is in a sealed container with a reliable Hashgacha. Additionally, it should be insured that the knife was scrubbed well with soap and water prior to cutting the fish. If the fish was already cut, the entire surface should be scraped off and washed well.

An additional issue that has arisen in recent years is that many otherwise Kosher species of fish may be infested with parasites that entail the prohibition against consuming bugs. There are various lists detailing which species from which countries are and are not problematic.

posted:2013-06-14 19:26:43  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Pareve Food-Basari Pot
Submitted by Shmuel Dorr  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:  

If the pot had been used for meat within the 24 hours prior to cooking the pareve food, the pareve food should not be eaten together with dairy. However, it may be eaten immediately before or after and may be placed on a dairy plate.

If the pot had not been used for meat within 24 hours prior to cooking a non-spicy pareve food, the pareve food may be eaten together with dairy. However, if the pareve food was spicy, it may not.

posted:2013-06-14 18:25:39  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - double ovens
Submitted by Simi  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:   1) To the best of my knowledge, double ovens sold in the USA generally do not vent into each other and are not a problem. If both of the foods are covered, it is certainly permitted. 2) It's ok. By the time the vapors from the oven reach the stovetop they are so dissipated as not to be problematic.
posted:2013-05-03 08:30:34  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Kashering a stove
Submitted by Simi  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

If by a "glass top" you mean that the elements are covered by a smooth sheet of glass such as the Corning Top, most Poskim hold that it cannot be Kashered and must be replaced. However, if you merely mean that the enamel coating on the surface under the grates is glass but the food and pots do not come into direct contact with it, it is irrelevant. Ideally the grates should be replaced or blow-torched, but strictly speaking as long as they were thoroughly cleaned with a caustic cleaner it is sufficient.

posted:2013-05-02 15:13:05  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - double oven
Submitted by Simi  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

1) It depends whether they vent into each other, but generally it is permitted.

2) Yes, as long as the bottom of the pan is clean.

3) As long as the grates are clean from any residue, it is not a problem.

posted:2013-05-02 15:10:14  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Stam Yayin
Submitted by Arye Cope  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: You may still drink the wine. Since the wine was not moved with the intent of trying to move the wine but rather for the use of the place it occupied, it is not considered moving the wine and the wine is therefore permitted.
posted:2013-03-29 12:09:36  (0) comments   email to a friend


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