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Showering the Night Before a Taanis

Ha Lachma Anya: Rav Eliyahu Dessler - Celebrating Freedom With Poor Bread

Rav Yaakov Edelstein - The Two Words He Wanted to Be Able to Speak
 
Section: Questions   Category: Halacha
  A r c h i v e s
Halacha - Silicon Cookware
Submitted by YW  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: Presuming the pan did not come into direct contact with actual, edible milchig residue, the pan may still be considered Pareve.
posted:2010-01-04 13:59:03  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - shaving body
Submitted by sarah  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

Not with a razor because of lo silbash, it is a feminine behavior.

posted:2010-01-03 21:28:18  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Kashrut of loose teas
Submitted by Nadav  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

According to the OU's website "All teas, regular, decaffeinated and herbal, that do not list artificial or natural flavorings or colorings in the ingredients are acceptable without any Kosher supervision or certification."

posted:2009-12-30 10:31:37  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Kohain
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: The Gemorra brings a disagreement between Rebbi Shimon bar Yochai and the Chachomim if a dead goy creates tumas ohel, the Rambam Tumas Meis 1:13 rules that it does not. While a goy does not become tamei from a meis according to the Torah, according to Rabbinic law he would become tamei from contact with a dead body, and presumably also from its ohel.
posted:2009-12-29 15:01:56  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Kashrus:turkey
Submitted by Tzvi Schneider  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: Well there certainly is no tradition on turkey dating back to Har Sinai, since the turkey is native to America and was unknown until 500 years ago. However similar, related fowl were known and eaten in the Old World. The issue arises "how does Halacha classify species/min"? The accepted psak is that the Torah definition of a "min" is much broader than the scientific term "species", and the turkey qualifies as larger variety of chicken, much as cows may be long-horned or short and many various colors, and they all are included in the tradition to eat cattle.
posted:2009-12-28 20:45:56  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Kosher Vegetables
Submitted by avi  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

It is advisable not to purchase cut fruit from a market that has no Kosher supervision because the knife may have been used previously in the meat or fish department. If necessary they fruit should be scraped clean at home. Packaged lettuce would only need a hechsher if it is from Israel and has issues of Teruma and Maaser or if you want to eat it without checking for insects. OU by itself generally indicates a Pareve product, unless it obviously isn't.

posted:2009-12-27 09:09:21  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - ebook/iphone etc
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

While there are some opinions that are strict on both issues, the prevailing opinion and common practice are to be lenient because there is no actual writing present.

posted:2009-12-23 05:47:42  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - shaving body
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: Not with a razor.
posted:2009-12-22 16:34:22  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Mikra at night
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: Thursday night is also fine. The Mishna Berura deduces from the Pri Megadim that it is only a preference to refrain from mikra at night but not an obligation, however the mekuballim are very strict on this issue based on the Arizal. While there are some opinions that permit chumash after chatzos, the predominant and accepted opinion is not until alos hashachar. If you learn Rashi together with the pesukim, it is permitted.
posted:2009-12-22 10:09:21  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Shiva
Submitted by anon  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: One does not sit shiva for other, distant relatives, however Kaddish may be recited. It is customary, however that one who has both parents does not recite Kaddish, in which case the best solution is to daven before the amud as chazzan whenever possible. A true avel will always have precedence oven one davening for a more distant relative.
posted:2009-12-21 09:06:49  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - shulchan aruch
Submitted by Shlomo M.  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: Yalkut Yosef writes that the minhag Sefaradi is not to recite "al mitzvat tzitzit" at all and to rely on "l'hitatef" on the talit gadol.
posted:2009-12-16 20:39:21  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Chanukah lights
Submitted by Tzvi Schneider  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: If literally nothing else is available it can't hurt, but you certainly should not say a beracha.In general an electric menora, while permitted by some authorities, is problematic for a number of reasons. It is unclear if the filament qualifies as a valid wick or if the electricity is acceptable as a fuel, additionally the spiral filament may be an avuka which is not valid for Channuka. Furthermore there is not a half hour of fuel present at the time of lighting, and it is not unanimously accepted that an incandescent bulb is a "fire". Based on all these factors, one should never make a beracha on an electric menora. However using the standard fixture in your room provides an added complication. The primary purpose of kindling lights on Channuka is pirsumei nissa, publicizing the miracle, and turning on the regular light is indistinguishable from what you would do every day and does not serve this purpose, your intentions aside.
posted:2009-12-14 14:35:12  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - havdalah
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: I would recommend davening Maariv earlier and making Havdala immediately at the zman you keep, just remember to repeat Kriyas Shema. It would also be acceptable to delay Havdala until your wife's return, but she would have to remember to say baruch hamavdil bein kodesh l'chol, and neither of you could eat until after Havdala.
posted:2009-12-13 19:26:29  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - laws pertaining to a niddah
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer:

First of all a woman is a nidda at any age if she has a discharge of blood from her uterus. It is actually not uncommon for a newborn girl to have such a discharge, and she is tamei until she goes to the mikva some 20 years later.

However today that we do not have a Beis HaMikdash and Kohanim do not eat teruma there is little practical impact in this impurity aside for the prohibition on marital relations. A Kohen today need only concern himself with impurity from contact with a dead body, and a non-Kohen need not even worry about that.

So the short answer to your question is that there may be spiritual impurity on the chair, but a man may sit on it.

posted:2009-12-11 15:02:15  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - lighting menorah
Submitted by Mr B  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question:
Answer: One may light before davening Mincha, but there are considerations that make it preferable to daven early. The menorah may not be lit before plag hamincha, about an hour before sunset. Also, if you light early enough to make it to shul for mincha, you must insure there is sufficient oil to burn until at least a half hour past tzeis hakochavim, totally burning approximately 2 and a half hours.
posted:2009-12-11 05:57:13  (0) comments   email to a friend


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