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Parshas Tzav: Rabbeinu Bachaye - Covering the Shame of Sinners

Parshas Tzav: Rabbeinu Bachaye - Covering the Shame of Sinners

Parshas Tzav: Rabbeinu Bachaye - Covering the Shame of Sinners

Parshas Pinchas: Rav Yehonoson Eibshitz - Where did Zimri the Great Tzaddik go Wrong?

Showering the Night Before a Taanis
 
Section: Questions   Category: Halacha
  A r c h i v e s
Halacha - Studying
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question: hi Rabbi, is one permitted to study for secular exam for end of yr 12 on shabbos or yomtov?
Answer: Studying secular subjects should not be done on Shabbos or Yom Tov, especially as preparation for a test that will follow.
posted:2011-10-11 23:46:48  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - buying house on chol hamoed
Submitted by obik  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question: Is it permitted to close on buying the new house on chol hamoed if the non-Jewish (or non-observant Jewish) seller is not cooperative and all attempts to postpone it for a later day have failed? I am talking about situation where the deal would not be cancelled but the relationship between the parties turn sour, which is never desirable. Would it make a difference if closing after chol hamoed will result in insignificant(compared to purchase price) penalties?
Answer:

The Shulchan Aruch in OC 539:12 singles out purchasing a house as more stringent during Chol HaMoed, as it is generally public knowledge.

Even for regular items, if they are not specifically required for Yom Tov and Chol HaMoed itself, a significant loss is necessary to permit. If the financial risk is minimal as you imply, it is difficult to allow this case. Preventing hard feelings is a very worthy cause, but I don't see that it justifies purchasing a house Chol HaMoed.

Of course, if there is any risk that the delay could lead to the deal falling through or concrete financial hardship due to the other side's intransigence, there are significant grounds to be lenient.

posted:2011-10-11 16:54:49  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Tevilas
Submitted by Tony  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question: HI there... Please forgive the spelling. Does medical equipment need to be toiveilled for use on a Jewish person. Items such as Needles, suture, drips etc. If the answer is yes, then is there a definitive list for clarity?
Answer: It is only necessary to toivel equipment that is used either for the preparation or serving of food.
posted:2011-10-10 05:34:03  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - brocha on raw batter
Submitted by Aharon Subar  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question: What is the brocha rishona and brocha acharona on: 1. raw cookie dough 2. raw cake batter
Answer: both are Shehakol and Borei Nefashos.
posted:2011-10-03 23:10:17  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - davening towards south
Submitted by ken dravich  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question: L'kavod haRav. I saw a shayla and teshuva that Rav Peretz wrote about facing a different direction than his feet are. I had the same question as the questioner. If one wants to be wise, he should turn his face towards the south and his feet towards mizrach with the rest of the congregation. However, this position is very painful, even when turning the hips to the south as well as the face. Is this what the Mishnah Berurah recommends to do? And if so, is it enough to turn one's hips and face to the South, kol z'man his feet are positioned eastward, or must one keep his hips AND his feet eastward. Thanks a lot.
Answer: For the Inyan of turning South to become wise, it is only necessary and recommended to turn very slightly towards the South. this should not be uncomfortable.
posted:2011-09-07 05:58:40  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Crushed Matza as Pas
Submitted by Adam  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question: Can one use matza farfel or even matza meal for an eruv chatzeirot (say in an apartment building)? Shouldn't it be just as good as regular matza? I find it easier to store then normal matza.
Answer:  

Technically, it should be adequate, as the entire purpose of the Eiruv is that all of the residents have a joint interest in one of the houses, and this should be accomplished by placing an item that they all own jointly in one of the residences.

However, it is not so simple. Since it used to be customary for each member of the Eiruv to contribute part of the required amount of bread needed, Chazal were concerned that it could lead to strife if an individual gave a mere piece of bread. Therefore, the Mishna in Eiruvin the bottom of 80b requires each family to contribute a complete loaf, and a large slice or chunk of bread is not acceptable. This Halacha is brought in Shulchan Aruch OC 366:6.

In the following Seif, the Shulchan Aruch qualifies this restriction that it only applies when the original formula of each individual contributing is being followed. In the more common practice today that one individual grants ownership to all the participants, the concern of strife is irrelevant and the Takana is not binding.

posted:2011-09-02 14:39:15  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - eruv matza
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question: can the eruv matza be kept in a closet? i thought it had to be usable room. does a closet off of a room count?
Answer:  

The Shulchan Aruch writes in OC 366:2 that the Eiruv must be placed in an area that is livable and not in a hut smaller that 4 amos by 4 amos, so your concern would appear to be justified.

However, the Biur Halacha there quotes the Tosfos Shabbos that a small room that opens into a larger room is acceptable, as we view the Eiruv as if it is located in the larger, livable location. This would include a closet, and it would seem to be, in fact, an acceptable option.

Nevertheless, the Biur Halacha concludes that he is not convinced by the logic of the Tosafos Shabbos, and he remains without a decisive conclusion. Certainly, it would be preferable to be Machmir.

posted:2011-08-31 16:27:11  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Kiddush Shabbos Day
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question: Shabbos Nachamu I went to make kiddush. When I looked in the fridge, the grape juice that was there after 9 Av, was gone. There was no wine or whiskey. There was Challah and Apple Juice (from concentrate with fresh AJ as well). Should Kiddush be made on the Challah, the Apple Juice or no Kidducsh can be made at all? Thank you.
Answer:  

This Halacha will depend on whether we are discussing the Friday night Kiddush or the one on Shabbos morning.

Friday night, the only acceptable alternative to wine or grape juice is to make Kiddush on the Challos themselves. Even this is only permitted according to the Rema if there is no wine available in the entire city, an unlikely prospect.

On Shabbos morning, it is better to use beer or whiskey than it is to use Challa; however, if neither those nor wine or grape juice are available, Kiddush may be recited on Challa. Soda and juice primarily from concentrate are not acceptable alternatives.

The implication of your question was that you are not referring to a family who has no alternative for Kiddush, rather the situation was a social Kiddush in Shul in the morning. Presuming there is no great need to make a Kiddush in Shul after Davening, if wine, grape juice or other similar liquids are unavailable, it would be better to forgo the Kiddush altogether than to rely on less than ideal arrangements.

posted:2011-08-31 10:30:21  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - tevilas keilim
Submitted by Chesky  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question: does a metal sink insert require tevilah?
Answer:  

No, it is neither a utensil for preparing food not one for serving and eating it.

posted:2011-08-28 21:59:59  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Mezuza for Non Jews
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question: Am I allowed to take town a mezuza on the house of a neighbor who is not Jewish, but bought the house from Jews and left the mezuza up?
Answer: Not only are you allowed to remove the mezuza, but it should be removed if Jews no longer live there. Of course, you should first get permission from the current owner.
posted:2011-08-28 11:52:48  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - eruv
Submitted by AA  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question: Hi I live in an apartment building in an area that has an eruv. If the eruv is down one week for whatever reason, do I need to 'rent' the hallways from my non-Jewish neighbors in order to carry in the halls, or is the general city-wide rental still good enough? I reason that just because the physical eruv strings are down does not mean the Jews don't still 'own' the property. Is this correct?
Answer:  

You are 100% correct. The strings and the ownership are two independent issues, and one does not impact upon the second.

The strings allow the streets and other public areas in the city to be classified as a private domain as opposed to a public one; however, one may still not carry from one private domain to a second one on Shabbos. The way to resolve this issue is by placing food owned by all the residents of the Eiruv in a location inside the Eiruv, and by this means we can consider all the separate private domains to have a common interest. This common interest remains even if the string breaks.

posted:2011-08-17 16:10:54  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Kiddush Shabbos morning with no Chamar Medina
Submitted by anonymous  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question: This past Shabbos in shul it was discovered that there was no wine, grape juice, whiskey or even beer. There was soda and Apple juice (concentrate with real juice as well in the bottle). There was also the challa for the seudah. How should we have made/not made kiddush? (P.S. There was grape juice in shul when I checked 10 Av) so this was an unexpected situation. Thank you.
Answer:  

This Halacha will depend on whether we are discussing the Friday night Kiddush or the one on Shabbos morning.

Friday night, the only acceptable alternative to wine or grape juice is to make Kiddush on the Challos themselves. Even this is only permitted according to the Rema if there is no wine available in the entire city, an unlikely prospect.

On Shabbos morning, it is better to use beer or whiskey than it is to use Challa; however, if neither those nor wine or grape juice are available, Kiddush may be recited on Challa. Soda and juice primarily from concentrate are not acceptable alternatives.

The implication of your question was that you are not referring to a family who has no alternative for Kiddush, rather the situation was a social Kiddush in Shul in the morning. Presuming there is no great need to make a Kiddush in Shul after Davening, if wine, grape juice or other similar liquids are unavailable, it would be better to forgo the Kiddush altogether than to rely on less than ideal arrangements.

posted:2011-08-17 10:23:10  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - milchig spoon washed together with fleishig china
Submitted by Leah  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question: Hello, We have only one sink, stained steel for milchig and fleishig. Because it is impossib le for us to change this at the time, we ussualy wash first one thing and then after cleaning the sink with hot water we wash the other. Today one of the kids threw a milchig spoon with milchig residues into the sink while the cleaning lady was washing the fleishig china, and got washed together in cold soap water. Although there was no fleishig residue on the plates, what is the halacha for them? Do I have to throw out the fleishig china? The spoon can be kashered? Thanks
Answer: If the milchig spoon and fleishig china were only together in cold water, they are both still Kosher and nothing needs to be thrown out or Kashered.
posted:2011-08-10 12:55:33  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Nine days
Submitted by Ronny Biderman  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question: There is a recipe for onion soup that my kids want to break their fast on that calls for wine. Can you make a dish that has wine in the recipe during the nine days?
Answer: During the 9 days itself we do not use wine. Shulchan Aruch OC 551:10 quotes a Minhag that even though we do not eat meat during the 9 days; however, a food cooked with meat may be eaten without the meat, for example cholent potatoes. The Mishna Berura s.k. 63 differentiates that to add schmaltz would still be forbidden. In any event, he concludes, the Minhag today is not to eat any food cooked with meat itself, unlike the Shulchan Aruch.

Presumably, adding actual wine to a soup would be more similar to adding schmaltz than to a tavshil basar with removing the meat. However, the Be'er Hetiv 29 quotes the Taz who permits adding wine according to the Shulchan Aruch's Minhag. The Be'er Hetiv concludes that according to our more stringent Minhag this would also be forbidden. Apparently, he compares adding wine to a recipe to a tavshil basar and not to schmaltz.

Motzei Tisha b'Av we do not eat meat or drink wine, similar to the entire 9 days. However, the Biur Halacha in the beginning of 558 quotes the Maamar Mordechai to permit a tavshil basar, and seemingly agrees that to be lenient. Though one could argue that the Maamar Mordechei is following the Minhag of Shulchan Aruch to permit this the entire 9 days, the Biur Halacha does not seem to accept this. Since the Be'er Hetiv was only machmir not to rely on the Taz's permitting wine due to the Minhag and the Minhag is different Motzei Tisha b'Av than the rest of the 9 days, adding wine to the soup should be allowed.

Certainly, is the wine is less than 1/60th of the soup, or even if it is more but does not add a distinct taste of wine to the soup, it is unquestionably allowed.

posted:2011-08-09 14:29:32  (0) comments   email to a friend


Halacha - Fast Days
Submitted by sm  Answered by Rav Peretz Moncharsh
Question: Dear Rabbi, Can one put on Chapstick on a Fast Day, like Tisha B'Av or Yom Kippur? Thank you.
Answer: The issue with chapstick would not be eating, as it is not ingested nor edible. However, there would be an issue with annointing. Presuming it is being done to avoid painfully chapped lips and not for pleasure, it would be allowed on Tisha b'Av but not on Yom Kippur.
posted:2011-08-09 13:48:03  (0) comments   email to a friend


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