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Section:  Avodah   Category: Olam HaTorah
Parshas Noach - Why Didn't The Fish Die In The Mabul?

Every single living creature on earth outside the teiva during the Mabul died, except for the fish.  The explanation for the destruction of innocent animals is that the world is created to revolve around mankind and man influences his environment.  Man's corrupt ways spreads unconsciously even to animal that do not possess intelligence to make any decisions.  Such is the power of humanity.

Why were the fish spared?  Why were they protected from man's influence?  Many explain that since they lived alone and not with man, the influence did not spread to them.  However most living creature live far away from civilization and have never been in a 100 mile radius of a human.  Why were the animals in the middle of the desert, the beasts of the Himalayas, the species living in a remote island in the South Pacific, or the living creatures in Antarctica killed?  Were they more influenced by man then the fish swimming off the Mediterranean coast?

Maybe we can offer B'Derech Drush as follows.  It is impossible for anyone to hermetically seal himself from bad surroundings.  No matter how strongly we protest and fight off bad ideas and negative influences, when society degenerates a level, the top of society goes down as well although no one notices because they are all focusing on he bottom of the totem pole.  

There is only one way to prevent yourself from falling and even elevating yourself in this period of decay, to immerse yourself in Torah.  If your life is Torah you will protected from all that goes on around you and continue to soar to lofty levels even as the world crumbles around you.

Ein Mayim Elah Torah.  Water is compared to Torah.  While animals that never came face to face with mankind disintegrated with the rot of human behavior, the fish who were immersed in water were able to come face to face with mankind and not be influence the slightest bit. They were in a world of their own, a world of water or Torah.