http://revach.net/article.php?id=2537

Section: DAF YOMI   Category: Lessons From The Daf
Lesson From A Dangerous Brawl

Rabbi Achi the son of Rabbi Yoshiyah deposited a silver vessel with custodians in Nehardea. He said to Rabbi Dustai the son of Rabbi Yannai and to Rabbi Yosi the son of Kippeir, who were on their way there, “When you come back from Nehardea, bring me the vessel back.”

They went and got it from the custodians. After an argument the custodian wanted it back. Rabbi Dustai the son of Rabbi Yannai was willing, but Rabbi Yosi the son of Kippeir refused. The custodians started to hurt Rabbi Yosi the son of Kippeir (in order to get the vessel back). They said to Rabbi Dustai, “See what your friend is doing.” He replied, “Beat him up good!” When they returned to Rabbi Achi the son of Rabbi Yoshiyah, Rabbi Yosi said, “Look, master, not only did he not assist me, but he even said to them, ‘Beat him up good’!” Rabbi Achi the son of Rabbi Yoshiyah asked Rabbi Dustai, “Why did you act in that manner?” He replied, “Those people are very tall and their hats are very tall, and their voices comes from their midsection (since they had very deep voices), and their names are frightening - Arda and Arta and Phili as their leader.  If they give instructions, ‘Tie him up,’ they tie him up; if they instruct, ‘kill him,’ you are killed. If they had killed Dustai, who would have given Yannai, my father, a son like me?” After asking a few more question  Rav Achi ruled that Rabbi Dustai acted properly. 

A few notes
 
1.  Rashi cites two explanations as to what Rav Dustai said when the custodians were hurting Rabbi Yosi. Either he said, “Beat him up good (in order that he should return the vessel to them)!” Or, he said, “He is deserving of this (since he is not returning the vessel).” Some Rishonim derive from here that it is permitted to save oneself with someone else’s body, for Rav Dustai was telling them to hit Rabbi Yosi because he was terrified that he would get hit.

2.  Rabbi Dustai excused his actions by saying, “Those people are very tall and their hats are very tall, and their voices comes from their midsection, and their names are frightening - Arda and Arta and Phili as their leader.” Rashi explains that they were men of great dimensions and they wore awesome clothing.  And since they had very deep voices, it appeared as if their voices were coming from their midsections. The Maharsha brings an alternative explanation according to the simple reading of the Gemora: They were one cubit tall and their hats were one cubit tall. It was because of this that their voices appeared to emanate from their midsections.

3.  Rabbi Dustai concluded, “If they had killed Dustai, who would have given Yannai, my father, a son like me?” The Vilna Gaon states that it may be gleaned from here that when a son adds an honorable title to his father’s name, he is permitted to say his father’s name. It is only forbidden for one to say his father’s name without a title.