Revach L'Neshama http://revach.net/ RSS feed for - Section: DAF YOMI Copyright 2007, Revach L'Neshama en-US Revach L'Neshama Logo 144 31 http://revach.net/img/small_header.jpg http://revach.net/ info@revach.net Mon, 01 Sep 2014 03:00:00 -0700 240 Moed Katan 22 - SUMMARY If the elder of the house accompanied the bier to the cemetery and arrived within the first three days, he counts the seven days of mourning together with the other mourners. If the mourners are not accompanying the bier to the cemetery, as soon as they turn back at the gates of the city, they begin the mourning period. If the mourners are still being comforted at the time of his arrival, that is when R. Shimon holds that even if a mourner arrives on the seventh daym, he counts the mourning period together with the other mourners. (1) It is preferable to hasten bringing the bier to burial unless it is the funeral of a father or mother. (2) A mourner has a choice whether to abstain from work during the mourning period (work that is permitted to a mourner such as commerce). He also has a choice whether to bare his shoulder. (3) A mourner may take a haircut and attend a wedding after 30 days. If a parent passed away, the mourner may not take a haircut until his friends yell at him, and may not attend a wedding until after 12 months. A mourner rips only his outer clothing the length of one handbreadth. If a parent passed away, the mourner rips even the underclothing clothing and he must rip until he reveals his heart. A mourner has a choice whether to rip at the collar or not, and he may stitch up the rip after seven days and repair it properly after thirty days. If a parent passed away the mourner may not rip by the collar and may never repair it properly. (4) A mourner has a choice whether to rip by hand or using a utensil. If a parent passed the mourner must rip by hand. The mourner has a choice whether to insert his hands inside his clothing in order to tear or to rip from the outside. If a parent or the Nasi passes away the mourner must rip from the outside. If a Torah scholar passes away his Beis Midrash is vacated; if the head of the Beis Din dies all the Batei Midrash in the city are vacated; and if the Nasi dies all of the Batei Midrash everywhere are vacated.
 
**A BIT MORE**
1. If the comforters are getting ready to get up and have not yet gotten up, it remains a question to the Gemara whether he must count his own seven days according to R. Shimon. 2. If it is Erev Shabbos or Yom Tov even the bier of a father or mother should be brought to burial as expediently as possible. 3. If a parent passes away, the children must abstain from work and must bare their shoulder. 4. R. Yehudah learns out from a Pasuk that all mourners must rip under the collar because a rip at the collar is not regarded as a rip at all.

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Moed Katan 22 - INSIGHTS The Gemara says that if the mourners do not plan on accompanying the deceased, they start the mourning period as soon as they turn back at the gates of the city. The Ramban says that is only true if the bier is being taken to a different city. Since the bier is given over to the people that are dealing with the burial, the mourners have put it out of their minds and thus the mourning period starts from that time. But if it is being taken to a cemetery outside the city, since it is not being taken far away, the mourners still have the burial in their minds. Therefore, they do not start the mourning period until the people that accompany the bier return and tell them that the deceased has been buried.

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Moed Katan 22 - HALACHA A mourner may go to a wedding after thirty days, but if one is mourning a parent it is forbidden until after twelve months. Even if it is a leap year, it is permitted after twelve months. If a person has an obligation to host a social meal, he may do so after seven days. But if he is not obligated to do so, he must wait until after thirty days. If he is mourning a parent, he may not attend a social meal even if he has an obligation to do so. The fact that it is permitted to go to a wedding after twelve months implies that the mourning period is completed after twelve months even if it is a leap year. Those people who continue their mourning even in the thirteenth month are doing so without any source and for no apparent reason. (Taz)

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Moed Katan 21 - SUMMARY A mourner must sit on a over-turned bed and may not sit on a chair, a bed, a mortar, or even on the ground. A mourner is prohibited to do work, bathe, use rubbing oil, have marital relations, or to wear shoes. He may also not learn Torah. (1) There is a dispute between R. Eliezer and R. Yehoshua regarding the extent of the prohibition for a mourner to wear Tefilin. (2) The first three days of the mourning period it is prohibited to do work even if he is very poor, to go to the house of another mourner, or to greet his friend with Shalom. (3) Out of respect for a public gathering it is permitted to wish them Shalom even during the first three days of the mourning period. A person that meets his friend within his thirty days mourning period (or within the twelve month mourning period for the death of a parent) should comfort him and refrain from greeting him with Shalom. If he meets him after thirty days, he may greet him with Shalom and should refrain from comforting him. After the seven day mourning period is completed, it is permitted for the mourner to greet others with Shalom. However, others should not greet the mourner with Shalom. (4) After the thirty-day mourning period for a relative or after the twelve month mourning period for a parent, one may offer subtle words of comfort. According to the Tana Kama, if mourners who were within a close proximity arrived at the house of mourning within the first three days, he counts the seven days of mourning together with the other mourners. (5)
 
**A BIT MORE**
1. A mourner may not read from the Torah, Nevi'im or Kesuvim, and also may not learn Mishnah, Midrash, Halachos, Shas and Agados. However if he was needed by the public (for his Torah lectures) he may learn Torah. 2. R. Eliezer holds a mourner may wear Tefilin starting from the third day of the mourning period and if people arrive for the first time on the third day, he does not have to remove the Tefilin. R. Yehoshua holds that he may start wearing Tefilin starting from the second day, but if people arrive for the first time on the second day, he must remove them. 3. After three days it is permitted for a mourner to do work covertly in his house, to go to the house of another mourner as long as he sits together with the other mourners, and to return a greeting of Shalom, but he may not initiate the greeting. 4. If others make the mistake to greet a mourner within the thirty day mourning period, he may respond in kind. However, during the first three days he should notify them that he is a mourner and should not return the greeting. 5. R. Shimon holds that even if he arrives on the seventh day from a close proximity, he counts the mourning period together with the other mourners. However they both agree that if it was the elder of the mourners that was away, he must count his own seven days of mourning,

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Moed Katan 21 - INSIGHTS The Maharitz says that the prohibition for a mourner to wear Tefilin on the first day is only if the death and burial are on the same day. The reason for that is that the first day of mourning is a Torah obligation only when the burial is on the same day as the death. But if the burial is on the following night, then even the first day of mourning is not a Torah obligation and it is only mid'Rabanan. When the mourning period is only mid'Rabanan the mourners must put on Tefilin. The Nodah b'Yehudah argues because the Ramban says that a mourner may not wear Tefilin during the first day of mourning even if he only found out about the death at a later date (as long as it is within thirty days). There is no Torah obligation for the mourning period if he only finds out about the death later on, yet it is forbidden to wear Tefilin the first day. Therefore in the case where the burial and death are not on the same day, even though it is only mid'Rabanan the mourner may not wear Tefilin. (Dagul m'Revavah)

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Moed Katan 21 - HALACHA Since a mourner may not greet people with Shalom, it is certainly forbidden for a mourner to speak excessively. If a large crowd comes to comfort the mourner, out of respect for the crowd it is permitted for the mourner to tell them to go to their houses with Shalom. There are those that are lenient nowadays with regards to greeting a mourner with Shalom. There is no obvious reason for this leniency unless you say that our manner of greeting is not the same as greeting with the word Shalom. (Shulchan Aruch YD 385:1)

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Moed Katan 20 - SUMMARY If a close relative dies on Yom Tov, the seven days of mourning start after Yom Tov (1) According to R. Yochanan and R. Elazar, if a close relative dies on Yom Tov the days of Yom Tov count toward the thirty days mourning period. Beis Shamai hold that if the mourning period started three days prior to Yom Tov, it does not have to be made up after Yom Tov, while Beis Hillel hold even if it started only moments before Yom Tov, it does not have to be made up. If a person finds out a while after the burial that a relative died, there is a dispute between the Chachamim and R. Akiva regarding the length of the mourning period. (2) A partial day of mourning is regarded as an entire day. (3) If a person found out on Yom Tov or Shabbos that a relative died within thirty days, but by the end of Yom Tov or Shabbos thirty days had passed since the time of burial, then only one day of mourning is necessary. There is a dispute between the Amora'im whether there is a Mitzvah to rip one's clothing if the mourning period is only one day. However, for a mother or father everyone agrees that it is a Mitzvah to rip the clothing. The mourning period applies to all relatives that a Kohen may become Tamei (ritually impure) from them, and it also includes other relatives that a Kohen may not become Tamei from them. (4) A mourner must rip his clothes while standing.
 
**A BIT MORE**
1. Although when a relative dies on Yom Tov, the seven days of mourning start after Yom Tov, if the public comforted the mourners for three days on Yom Tov, the mourners only need to be comforted for four days after Yom Tov. 2. R. Akiva holds that if one finds out within thirty days of burial that a relative died, he must sit the full seven and thirty days mourning period. But if he hears about it only after thirty days, he only sits for one day. The Chachamim hold that in both cases he must sit the full seven and thirty days mourning period. 3. According to the opinion that if one does not find out that his relative died until after thirty days, then his mourning period is only one day, the mourning period does not have to be more than a moment, since part of a day is regarded as an entire day. 4. A Kohen may not become Tamei to a sister or brother from the mother or to a married sister, however the mourning period would apply to these relatives.

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Moed Katan 20 - INSIGHTS The Gemara says that we learn out from Chag that the mourning period is seven days. Just like the Chag of Pesach is seven days, the mourning period is seven days as well. The Yerushalmi asks why we don't learn it out from the mourning for Yakov Avinu as the Pasuk says "And he instituted for his father a mourning period of seven days." The answer is that the mourning period for Yakov was prior to burial, while we sit the seven days of mourning only after burial. Therefore we can't learn it out from there. Alternatively, we can't learn out anything from what occurred prior to Matan Torah. (Tosfos)

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Moed Katan 20 - HALACHA The Mitzvah to rip one's clothing does not apply if one does not find out until after thirty days from the burial, but for a father or a mother one shall always rip the clothing. In a circumstance where there is no Mitzvah requirement to rip clothing, it is forbidden to be stringent and rip anyway. (Shulchan Aruch YD 402:4) It is forbidden to be stringent and rip clothing if there is no obligation because it is a transgression of Bal Tashchis. However for a father or mother or a great Torah scholar, it is permitted to rip excessively. (Shach, Be'er Hetev)

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