Revach L'Neshama http://revach.net/ RSS feed for - Section: HALACHA Category:DAILY HALACHA Copyright 2007, Revach L'Neshama en-US Revach L'Neshama Logo 144 31 http://revach.net/img/small_header.jpg http://revach.net/ info@revach.net Sat, 16 Dec 2017 03:00:00 -0800 240 Personal Tefilos During Shmoneh Esrei - What You Should Know http://revach.net/article.php?id=5335 http://revach.net/article.php?id=5335

There is a Mitzva to daven to Hashem for all your needs. The Anshei Knesses HaGedola created a standard Nusach for Shmoneh Esrei, to cover all the essentials. Nevertheless Hashem still wants to hear our personal requests from our heart, especially since Shmoneh Esrei, that is repeated three times a day is often said by rote.

How and when is this done? The Shulchan Aruch (OC 119) mentions three places in Shmoneh Esrei where perosnal tefilos can be added. First, and best, is during each bracha, where one can make a personal request which is related to that bracha. There are a few rules one should know before doing this.

- One must start with the Nusach of Chazal, and only then insert their personal tefila.
- The tefila should be personal and not for the Tzibbur.
- It is preferable to add things right before the Chasima (Boruch Ata) but then to add words after that match the Chasima.
- One should only add requests that are for now and not for the future. For example if a person needs parnasa he can ask, but a wealthy person should not ask Hashem to let his wealth continue.
- It preferable to add a Tefila in Lashon Kodesh, but the most important thing is that it should come from the heart, in any language he can communicate.
- The request should be succinct.
- One should not add a tefila that he says all the time, since it will look like he is adding to the Nusach of the davening. At the very least he should skip any additional tefilos once a week.

Although the best time to ask personal requests are during the relevant Bracha, during the bracha of Shomei'a Tefila one can ask whatever he wants, including request for the future and the tzibbur, but he should still keep it to a minimum. Lastly one may add personal tefilos after Yihiyu L'Ratzon and add as much as his heart desires!

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Tue, 16 Feb 2016 03:00:00 -0800
Rav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach & Rav Elyashiv: Washing Netilas Yadayim After A Blood Test http://revach.net/article.php?id=3925 http://revach.net/article.php?id=3925

The Shulchan Aruch (OC 4:19) says that after bloodletting from your shoulder, if you don't wash Netilas Yadayim you will be scared for seven days.  What if you donate blood, or you take a blood test, or if you cut yourself and bleed, must you wash Netilas Yadayim?

The Nishmas Avrohom brings that some say since this is a Din from the gemara, it is worthwhile to be machmir even when you give blood for lab tests.  If so he says then why not also wash when you get a cut?  He brings from Rav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach that you only need to wash after you let blood for the sake of curing yourself from excess blood.  He holds that since this is segula, we need not take it further than the actual words of the gemara.  When asked regarding giving blood for the health of others, Rav Shlomo Zalman answered that you only need to wash when done for your own refuah.  Since giving to others is a mitzva, nothing bad will happen from it.

In a tshuva from Rav Elyashiv, writes the Nishmas Avrohom, he says that giving blood is included in what the gemara says about bloodletting and you should wash your hands as per the Shulchan Aruch.  However even Rav Elyashiv agrees that after giving blood for a lab test you need not wash your hands.

Important Note: We try to convey the Tshuva to the best of our ability. We admit that our understanding may not be accurate. One should learn the tshuva to verify the accuracy of our interpretation.  Please also understand that this Tshuva may not be the final word on this topic. One should consult a Rav before drawing any conclusions.

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Sun, 12 Jul 2009 03:00:00 -0700
Rebbi Akiva Eiger - A Trick To Avoid Forgetting Things http://revach.net/article.php?id=3911 http://revach.net/article.php?id=3911

There are a number of activities that Chazal say make you forget.  Some say that these activities don't make you forget but they prevent you from learning and absorbing Torah.  For a more detailed list see Revach Lists.  One of the things listed is putting on two articles of clothing at the same time.  The Aruch HaShulchan says that this does not apply to shoes (although there are halachos how to put on shoes).

What happens if for whatever reason you did one of these activities but you do not want to suffer the consequences.  Rebbi Akiva Eiger (YD 376) provide the answer.  He says you should say the bracha of Ahava Rabba which is said before Shema in the morning without saying the bracha at the end.(see also Shearim Metzuyanim B'Halacha 3:3)

Important Note: We try to convey the Tshuva to the best of our ability. We admit that our understanding may not be accurate. One should learn the tshuva to verify the accuracy of our interpretation. Please also understand that this Tshuva may not be the final word on this topic. One should consult a Rav before drawing any conclusions.

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Tue, 07 Jul 2009 03:00:00 -0700
How Unholy Are Our Bathroom Walls? http://revach.net/article.php?id=3896 http://revach.net/article.php?id=3896

The Shulchan Aruch (OC 83:1) paskens that you may daven near a bathroom, on the other side of the wall. The Mogen Avrohom argues and says that you should not be lenient even if there is a complete wall. The Kitzur Shulchan Aruch (5:12) paskens that you may not daven even within four amos of a bathroom wall even if the bathroom is perfectly clean.

The She'arim Metzuyanim B'Halacha says that today this whole machlokes is irrelevant. In those days the bathroom was an outhouse in the yard. Therefore the wall served only the bathroom and was considered a bathroom wall. The issur of davening near the bathroom wall is not because you are near the bathroom, but rather because a bathroom wall itself is not something you should stand near when davening.

Today the bathroom is a room inside the house and the wall has a dual purpose. It not only supports the bathroom but it is a wall for the house as well. This is not called a bathroom wall for the purpose of prohibiting standing next to it by davening.

Important Note: We try to convey the Tshuva to the best of our ability. We admit that our understanding may not be accurate. One should learn the tshuva to verify the accuracy of our interpretation. Please also understand that this Tshuva may not be the final word on this topic. One should consult a Rav before drawing any conclusions.

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Wed, 01 Jul 2009 03:00:00 -0700
Getting Dressed - Rav Moshe Feinstein On The American Wardrobe http://revach.net/article.php?id=3882 http://revach.net/article.php?id=3882

The Kitzur Shulchan Aruch brings L'Halacha that a Jew may not wear clothing styles like a non-Jew. The poskim bring many different reasons for this and each reason has a specific implication. Rav Moshe Feinstein (YD 1:81)was asked in 1952 whether Polish immigrants who arrived on the shores of the US were obligated to wear clothing like they wore in Europe or they are permitted to adopted classic American style dress. Since almost everybody in not Makpid, Rav Moshe was asked if there was validity to their leniency.

Rav Moshe brings the opinion of the Maharik who says that non-Jewish clothing are assur if they are worn for Pritzus or Ga'ava or if a Jew wears it because he specifically wants to dress like a Goy. Even if the person wants to dress like a goy, if there is a valid purpose for this type of dress it is permitted (this would apply to professional dress code like Doctors). He also brings the Rema who holds like the Ran that it is assur even for no apparent reason because it may have something to do with Avodah Zara an Darkei HaEmori.

Therefore concludes Rav Moshe there is no issur whatsoever for a person to dress American style even straight off the boat from Poland. Moreover, says Rav Moshe, what makes this style Goyish? When the style first started the Jews dressed that way as well, so the Goyim cannot claim it to be their own. Therefore even according to the Vilna Gaon who argues on the Maharik and the Rema, in this case there is no problem.

With regard to keeping the Minhag of their fathers, says Rav Moshe, since this is not called clothing of Goyim but rather clothing of American Jews, there is no problem to change from the clothing style of the Jews in the place you came to the style of the Jews in the place where you are now.

In closing Rav Moshe says that this only applies to respectable clothing. Styles that are not modest fall under the issur even if the Jews adopt it from the outset.

Important Note: We try to convey the Tshuva to the best of our ability. We admit that our understanding may not be accurate. One should learn the tshuva to verify the accuracy of our interpretation. Please also understand that this Tshuva may not be the final word on this topic. One should consult a Rav before drawing any conclusions.

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Thu, 25 Jun 2009 03:00:00 -0700
The Obligation To Go To The Bathroom http://revach.net/article.php?id=3872 http://revach.net/article.php?id=3872 The Shulchan Aruch (OC 3:17) says that if you hold yourself back from relieving yourself when needed, you are oveir Ba'al Tishaktzu.  There is debate among the Poskim if this issur is Min HaTorah or MiDirabanan.  The Mogen Avrohom (103:4) holds that it is MiDirabanan.   The Mishna Brura (31) brings from the Pri Megadim that if you hold yourself back because of embarrassment, you are not oveir.  Additionally if you hold yourself back from passing gas you are not oveir this issur.

The She'arim Metzuyanim BaHalacha brings from the Divrei Chaim of Sanz that the  average man typically goes three hours before needing to releive himself and he need not rush to the bathroom based on imaginary needs.  Furthermore he says that Hesech HaDa'as, not thinking about it, also helps.

Important Note: We try to convey the Tshuva to the best of our ability. We admit that our understanding may not be accurate. One should learn the tshuva to verify the accuracy of our interpretation.  Please also understand that this Tshuva may not be the final word on this topic. One should consult a Rav before drawing any conclusions.

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Sun, 21 Jun 2009 03:00:00 -0700
What Is A Bathroom, And Can You Wash Your Hands There? http://revach.net/article.php?id=3867 http://revach.net/article.php?id=3867 The Shulchan Aruch writes (OC 4:18) that merely going into a bathroom requires you to wash Netilas Yadayim when you come out.  The Mishna Brura explains that this means even if you just enter and exit without doing anything there.  How do our bathrooms measure up?  Th biggest issue is when there is a sink only in the bathroom what do you do?

The reason why our bathrooms may not be a problem is based on a gemara that talks about bathrooms where the receptacle tank of the toilet is built on a slant and anything that goes into it automatically rolls far away outside the bathroom itself.  Because of this it is not halachicly considered a bathroom.  While at first glance, says the She'arim Metzuyanim B'Halacha, our flushable toilets would have the same status, there is a big difference.  Our toilets actually hold the waste until they are flushed while those mentioned in the gemara don't hold anything and it is removed from the premises without lingering even for a moment.

The Ois Chaim V'Shalom brings from his father the Darkei Tshuva that even our flushable toilet do not make it a bathroom since although it does linger until flushed, it is not Kavua since it is removed without too much delay.  Therefore although he was Machmir for himself, he was Meikil for others when the only sink was in the bathroom.

The She'arim Metzuyanim B'Halacha brings additional heteirim as well.  The Mogen Avrohom holds that even a toilet (Graf Shel Ri'i) does not make the room a bathroom if it is washed with a Revi'is after every use and is also meant for another use as well.  Therefore a bathroom that has shelves in it to store items would not be considered a bathroom for the din of Netilas Yadayim.

Another heter from the Chazon Ish is that a toilet coated with glass or metal that is washed after every use does not have the status of a toilet.  He too however says it is proper to be machmir.

Important Note: We try to convey the Tshuva to the best of our ability. We admit that our understanding may not be accurate. One should learn the tshuva to verify the accuracy of our interpretation.  Please also understand that this Tshuva may not be the final word on this topic. One should consult a Rav before drawing any conclusions.

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Thu, 18 Jun 2009 03:00:00 -0700
Rav Moshe Shternbuch: When A Jew Touches Your Food Without Negel Vasser http://revach.net/article.php?id=3861 http://revach.net/article.php?id=3861 Many eateries have non-religious Jews working in contact with the food we eat.  The Mishna Brura says (4:14) that Bidi'eved if a Jew touches your food without washing Negel Vasser you may eat it.  However he recommends rinsing the food three times.  Why are we no makpid on Jewish people touching our food?

Rav Moshe Shternbuch (2:3) says that maybe we can say that a Michalel Shabbos Bifarhesia has a Din of an Akum.  Therefore although he does become tamei from a dead body maybe with respect to the Ruach Ra that come at night, he does not become tamei.  Nevertheless says Rav Shternbuch, if you have any control of the situation you should insist that a Jewish employee washes their hands three times before touching the food.

Even if they don't it is perfectly permissible to eat says Rav Shternbuch, even if it is a religious Jew that touches it.  It is certainly a good minhag, however, to do as the Mishna Brura says and rinse the food three time if possible.

Important Note: We try to convey the Tshuva to the best of our ability. We admit that our understanding may not be accurate. One should learn the tshuva to verify the accuracy of our interpretation.  Please also understand that this Tshuva may not be the final word on this topic. One should consult a Rav before drawing any conclusions.

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Tue, 16 Jun 2009 03:00:00 -0700
Band-Aid Or Ring By Negel Vasser? http://revach.net/article.php?id=3853 http://revach.net/article.php?id=3853 When you wash your hands for bread you must remove all things from your hand that will prevent the water from washing underneath like a ring or band-aid.  What about by Negel Vasser, does the same problem apply?

Rav Shlomo Zalman Braun in She'arim Metzuyanim B'Halacha (2 k.a. 6) brings from the Sefer HaEshkol and the Yad Shaul that when a man goes to the Mikva for Tevilas Ezra (when he is a Ba'al Keri), a chatzitza does not invalidate the Tevila.  Therefore says Rav Braun, it is possible that the chatzitza does not pasul Negel Vasser.  He adds that it seems also from the words of the Eishel Avrohom that Negel Vasser is not as stringent as Netilas Yadayim for a seudah and the rules of chatzitza do not apply.

Important Note: We try to convey the Tshuva to the best of our ability. We admit that our understanding may not be accurate. One should learn the tshuva to verify the accuracy of our interpretation.  Please also understand that this Tshuva may not be the final word on this topic. One should consult a Rav before drawing any conclusions.

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Sun, 14 Jun 2009 03:00:00 -0700
Food Touched Before Negel Vasser http://revach.net/article.php?id=3847 http://revach.net/article.php?id=3847 The Kitzur Shulchan Aruch (2:5) says that you should not touch food before washing Negel Vasser since a Ruach Ra is on your hands and can damage the food.  The She'arim Metzuyanim BaHalacha brings the Shulchan Aruch HaRav who says that this does not apply to a non-Jew since the Ruach Ra is only attracted to the Kedusha of Jewish Neshama.  

Regarding a child, he says that there is also no problem because a child receives its main "Nefesh D'Kedusha" only at Bar Mitzva.  However the Maharsham says that a child is more susceptible to this Ruach Ra and one should be even more careful to make sure the child does not touch food before Negel Vasser.  The Pri Megadim also says to be careful with a child.

If food was touched, the poskim say that the food can be eaten since the Teva has changed and we don't really worry about these things anymore.  The Mishna Brura (4:14) brings from the Malbim that if food was touched before Negel Vasser it should be rinsed three times before eating it.

Important Note: We try to convey the Tshuva to the best of our ability. We admit that our understanding may not be accurate. One should learn the tshuva to verify the accuracy of our interpretation.  Please also understand that this Tshuva may not be the final word on this topic. One should consult a Rav before drawing any conclusions.

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Wed, 10 Jun 2009 03:00:00 -0700
What To Do About Tikun Chatzos http://revach.net/article.php?id=3840 http://revach.net/article.php?id=3840 The Shulchan Aruch itself does not explicitly mention Tikun Chatzos.  In (1:2) it says that tefilos over the Churban and the Galus are very desirable, if you are awake at the changing of the Mishmaros (each third of the night).   The next si'if says that it is fitting for every Yiras Shamayim to be sad about the Churban Bais HaMikdash.  The Mishna Brura (9) discusses at length some of the Inyanin of Tikun Chatzos, which includes sitting on the floor with ashes on your head and saying Tehilim and Piyutim.

It was, and still is, according to the minhag of the Arizal, the custom for Yechidim to sleep form the beginning of the night until Chatzos, then arise to say the Tikun and then learn until the time for davening in the morning.  Although revived somewhat in recent years, this minhag is by and large not performed by most Yirei Shamayim.  The reason given is the weakness of the generation.

However the Pischei Tshuvos (1:10) brings from various sources that each person should participate in this to the degree possible, and it should not be forgotten altogether.  Everyone should try to say it at least periodically, once a week, month, or at least during the three weeks.  Moreover if you cannot say the whole tikun you should at least say part of it or even one or two Pirkei Tehilim from the Tikun , or even a single pasuk (Darkei Shalom), or even just to think about it at Chatzos (Chavas Da'as).

Additionally says the Pischei Tshuvos, if you are still awake at Chatzos you may say it before you go to sleep (Rav Yaakov Emden, Malbim).

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Mon, 08 Jun 2009 03:00:00 -0700
Why Do We Get Up So Late? http://revach.net/article.php?id=3833 http://revach.net/article.php?id=3833

In the first Si'if in Shulchan Aruch the Michaber says the we must be "MiOrer HaShachar", we must wake up before dawn so we wake the dawn and it does not wake us.  Why do most people not wake up before dawn today as is written without dispute in Shulchan Aruch? 

The Mishna Brura says that if someone is weak by nature or if he knows that waking up early will cause him to fall asleep during davening then it is better for him to get the amount of sleep that he needs.  Since today the nature of the world has changed and most people do not wake before dawn, the Pischei Tshuvos says that based on this Mishna Brura, many Tzadikim and Yirei Shamayim do not wake up before dawn.  "Ein HaKadosh Baruch Hu Ba B'Trunia Im HaBriyos", Hashem does not look for excuses to pick on people.  However if someone does manage to arrange his schedule in accordance with the Shulchan Aruch, says the Pischei Tshuvos, Ashrei Lo V'Ashrei Chelko!

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Sun, 07 Jun 2009 03:00:00 -0700
How Much Time Should You Be Spending In Bed? http://revach.net/article.php?id=3826 http://revach.net/article.php?id=3826

The very first Halacha in Shulchan Aruch is "Yisgaber KaAri" to wake up early to serve Hashem, preferably before the day begins.  Is there any specific amount of hours a person should sleep?

The She'arim Metzuyanim B'Halacha brings from the Eishel Avrohom that you may sleep as long as necessary if the purpose is to strengthen your body.  Only sleeping for pleasure is frowned upon.  The Nimukei Orach Chaim is amazed that the Eishel Avrohom takes such a lenient position allowing unlimited amounts of sleep.  

The She'arim Metzuyanim wonders why  neither of these Poskim mention the opinion of the Taz in Even HaEzer (25:1) who says that it all depends on a persons nature.  Some Talmidei Chachomim manage on very little sleep.  Others sleep longer and learn less but learn in one hour what the others suffer and learn in two hours.  Both of them have s'char of "B'Chol Dirachecha Dei'eihu", all your actions should be L'Shem Hashem.

Important Note: We try to convey this opinion to the best of our ability. We admit that our understanding may not be accurate. One should learn the tshuva to verify the accuracy of our interpretation.  Please also understand that this Tshuva may not be the final word on this topic. One should consult a Rav before drawing any conclusions.

 

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Thu, 04 Jun 2009 03:00:00 -0700